SPORTS

29 Dec

NASCAR: Not Fast or Furious Enough?

Jeff Gordon, NASCAR, Daytona 500, Daytona, Talledega, Talledega Nights, Will Farrell, Sarah Palin, Tea Bag Party, new pavement, new track, Dale Earnhardt Jr, car racing, car engines, race track, Mark Martin, finish line, car crash, Matt Kenseth, repaved track, Kurt Busch, Indy 500, Juan Pablo Montoya, track construction

by Quintin Xavier Roper

It seems that Daytona is looking to raise the stakes with a focus on increasing the epic wrecks that make the sport so epic to watch.  Adding to the danger factor, a redesigned track will keep cars closer together with speeds up to 200 mph…..

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As a safety measure, the pit road was made wider during the renovation as a precaution and the track is overall smoother allowing the wheels to glide friction-free (which lessens the damage of the cars).

Jeff Gordon, NASCAR, Daytona 500, Daytona, Talledega, Talledega Nights, Will Farrell, Sarah Palin, Tea Bag Party, new pavement, new track, Dale Earnhardt Jr, car racing, car engines, race track, Mark Martin, finish line, car crash, Matt Kenseth, repaved track, Kurt Busch, Indy 500, Juan Pablo Montoya, track construction

After testing out the new track, many are comparing it to Talladega (and no, this is not a reference to the Will Ferrel movie).  The reduced width of the track will invite more abrasive tactics, and drivers fight for space.  Watching the races will be more like a lethal round of musical chairs, except the odd kid out ends up totaled and engulfed in flames.

This has also affected the design of the racing cars as some teams are opting to use smaller plates on their engines and more efficient fuels.  Although nothing official can be decided until the next round of testing in late January, the three lane track is already proving to be less problematic than the one before.  Drivers were cautious around the old track’s bumps and turbulent traction.

Jeff Gordon, NASCAR, Daytona 500, Daytona, Talledega, Talledega Nights, Will Farrell, Sarah Palin, Tea Bag Party, new pavement, new track, Dale Earnhardt Jr, car racing, car engines, race track, Mark Martin, finish line, car crash, Matt Kenseth, repaved track, Kurt Busch, Indy 500, Juan Pablo Montoya, track construction

For the die-hard NASCAR fan who hates change more than a Tea Bagger, you have nothing to worry about.  Other than the tracks surface, and a renovated pit area, viewers will not be able to tell much difference.  Visually it still remains historically accurate.

As a safety measure, the pit road was made wider during the renovation as a precaution and the track is overall smoother allowing the wheels to glide friction-free (which lessens the damage of the cars).

Jeff Gordon, NASCAR, Daytona 500, Daytona, Talledega, Talledega Nights, Will Farrell, Sarah Palin, Tea Bag Party, new pavement, new track, Dale Earnhardt Jr, car racing, car engines, race track, Mark Martin, finish line, car crash, Matt Kenseth, repaved track, Kurt Busch, Indy 500, Juan Pablo Montoya, track construction

After testing out the new track, many are comparing it to Talladega (and no, this is not a reference to the Will Ferrel movie).  The reduced width of the track will invite more abrasive tactics, and drivers fight for space.  Watching the races will be more like a lethal round of musical chairs, except the odd kid out ends up totaled and engulfed in flames.

This has also affected the design of the racing cars as some teams are opting to use smaller plates on their engines and more efficient fuels.  Although nothing official can be decided until the next round of testing in late January, the three lane track is already proving to be less problematic than the one before.  Drivers were cautious around the old track’s bumps and turbulent traction.

Jeff Gordon, NASCAR, Daytona 500, Daytona, Talledega, Talledega Nights, Will Farrell, Sarah Palin, Tea Bag Party, new pavement, new track, Dale Earnhardt Jr, car racing, car engines, race track, Mark Martin, finish line, car crash, Matt Kenseth, repaved track, Kurt Busch, Indy 500, Juan Pablo Montoya, track construction

For the die-hard NASCAR fan who hates change more than a Tea Bagger, you have nothing to worry about.  Other than the tracks surface, and a renovated pit area, viewers will not be able to tell much difference.  Visually it still remains historically accurate.


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